The Edible Garden Resource

This resource aims to inspire and equip members of the Jewish community to live healthier and more sustainable lifestyles. Throughout the Jewish community there are a multitude of ‘green spaces’ that are currently being under-utilised. These spaces are in synagogues, schools, and the premises of communal organisations. Big Green Jewish is working with communal organisations to develop these green spaces, turning them into ‘edible gardens’. These spaces can be used to educate members of the community on the importance of sustainable living, Jewish environmental and food ethics, whilst giving people the practical skills needed to live more sustainably in their daily lives.

Whether you are a teacher, educator, rabbi, synagogue member, attend a youth movement or a Jewish day school, this booklet will give you basic guidelines for how to start your own edible garden and use it as a learning tool. By setting up communal gardens we encourage the community to play a part in creating a sustainable future. Small changes can make a big difference.

To download the Key Stage 2 teaching resource, click here.

To download the Key Stage 3 teaching resource, click here.

To download the Hebrew Resources text, click here.

For more information on the previous government's sustainable schools initiative, click here.

18 Rabbis for 18 Days Resource

This resources aims to encourage reflection and debate. We invited rabbis to share what it is that inspires them to care about protecting our planet. The letters which make up the Hebrew word 'chai', meaning life, add up to 18. And so, we set out in search of 18 rabbis, and were very fortunate to receive 19 thought-provoking entries from across the UK and as far afield as Las Vegas and Sydney.

This resource can be used as part of a learning session or laminated and displayed by recycling points. It could also be used as place mats at lunchtime. To download the 18 Rabbis for 18 Days resources, click here.

The Eight Doorways

The National Framework details what schools need to do to become sustainable schools, there are eight ‘doorways’ through which schools may choose to initiate or extend their sustainable school activity. It focuses on ways in which sustainable development can be embedded into whole school management practices and provides practical guidance to help schools operate in a more sustainable way.

The Global Citizenship Project, an initiative of Tzedek, has created teaching resources for the ‘eight doorways’. These can be downloaded on-line here. The Jewish Council for Racial Equality has also contributed to these resources.

1. Food and Drink

By 2020 the government would like all schools to be offering and promoting healthy, local and sustainable food and drink, produced on site (where possible), with strong commitments to the environment, social responsibility and animal welfare, and with increased opportunity to involve local suppliers.

Where in the World

Where in the World Resource Sheet
(For Keystage 1 and Keystage 2)

2. Energy and Water

By 2020 the government would like all schools to have minimised their carbon emissions by becoming exemplars of energy efficiency and renewable energy, showcasing wind, solar, bio-fuel and other appropriate energy sources in their communities. Furthermore, the government would like all schools to have minimised their use of freshwater by becoming exemplars of sustainable water management, showcasing freshwater conservation, rainwater use, and other water conservation measures in their communities.

Chanukah and Energy

Chanukah and Energy Resource Sheet
(For Keystage 1 and Keystage 2)

3. Travel and Traffic

By 2020 the government would like all schools to be models of sustainable travel where vehicles are used only when absolutely necessary and facilities for healthier, less polluting or less dangerous modes of transport are exemplary.

Further details and resources click here.

4. Purchasing and Waste

By 2020 the government would like all schools to be models of resource efficiency by using low impact goods from local suppliers that minimise (or eliminate) packaging and that are produced with high environmental and ethical standards, and by recycling, repairing and reusing as much as possible.

Reduce, Re-use and Recycle

Reduce, Re-use and Recycle resources
(For Keystage 1 and Keystage 2)

Purchasing and Waste
(For Keystage 2 and Keystage 3)

5. Buildings and Grounds

By 2020 the government would like all schools buildings and grounds to be regarded as living, learning places where pupils see what a sustainable lifestyle means through their involvement in the continual improvement of the school estate.

Allotment Project
(For Keystage 1, 2 and 3)

For more information click here

6. Inclusion and Participation

By 2020 the government would like all schools to be acting as models of social inclusion, enabling all pupils to participate fully in school life while instilling a long-lasting respect for human rights, freedoms and creative expression.

Developing Diversity
(For Keystage 2 and Keystage 3)

Refugee Children
(For Keystage 2 and Keystage 3)

7. Local Well Being

By 2020 the government would like all schools to be models of good corporate citizenship within their local areas, enriching their educational mission with active support for the well-being of the local environment and community.

My Home, Your Home
(For Keystage 1, 2 and 3)

Local History Project
(For Keystage 1, 2 and 3)

8. Global Citizenship

By 2020 the government would like all schools to be models of good global citizenship, enriching their educational mission with active support for the well-being of the global environment and community.

The Jewish Global Citizenship Project
(For Keystage 1, 2, 3 and 4)

Further resources can be found on the Tzedek website here or in the lesson plan section here.

Climate Change & The Conference in Copenhagen

To download the teaching resource click here

These activities are aimed at teaching the causes of climate change and what will happen to the planet if we don’t change our lifestyle – as well as offering the opportunity to consider our Jewish responsibility to act. With one in every 19 people living in the world’s poorest countries at risk from climate change, compared to one in every 1,500 in the wealthiest; it is important to understand the impact our lifestyle has not just in the UK but how it affects people in developing countries.

Now is the time to act.

As the Kohelet Rabbah 7:13 reminds us, “when G-d created the first man, G-d showed him all the trees in the Garden of Eden and said, ‘See to it that you do not abuse or destroy My world. For if you abuse or destroy it, there is no one to repair it after you.’”

For more information click here.

The Engineer of Chelm

The Engineer of Chelm, a play based on classical Jewish fables and modern ecology, was shown at the Jewish Museum from 31 May - 6 June 2010. You can now access a host of environmental learning links, both Jewish and otherwise, as well as a specially prepared eco-Jewish learning pack on the play which can be downloaded. All links and resources can be found here.